Pudgie Revolution

Pie Iron Cookin' for Food Lovin' Campers


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Go Nuts for Donuts

There’s a hole lot to love about this maple-bacon-donut pudgie pie!

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Here’s what you need to make the magic happen:

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Split 1 cake donut and butter the cut sides.  Place buttered sides down in your pie iron pans and fill the holes with pieces from the other donut:

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Pile in the rest of the ingredients, close your iron and cook over a fire or grill until golden.

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Go Nuts for Donuts

Ingredients

  • 2 cake donuts, 1 split plus pieces for hole-filling
  • margarine
  • sweetened condensed milk
  • pecans or other nut, chopped
  • 2 slices cooked bacon, chopped
  • maple syrup
  • salt, just a pinch

Directions

Split 1 cake donut and spread margarine on the cut side.  Place cut side down in each pie iron pan.  Press donut halves into iron and fill gaps with donut pieces.  Drizzle in sweetened condensed milk and maple syrup and top with bacon, nuts, and salt.  Add another drizzle of sweetened condensed milk and close iron.  Cook over a fire or grill until golden, about 5 minutes per side.  Let cool before scarfing.

Trust us, you donut want to miss this pudgie pie!

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Pudgies in Season: Rhubarb!

Do yourself a flavor and use that backyard rhubarb bounty to make this tempting little tartlet.  If you miss this opportunity, you’ll surely rue the day!

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When we were developing this recipe for our pudgie pie cookbook, Pudgie Revolution, we found that raw rhubarb cooks perfectly in a pudgie pie.  Since rhubarb contains significant liquid, we needed to find a way to keep this pie from being a soggy mess.  The solution?  We nestled a few pie crust scraps inside to soak up the excess moisture.  It works perfectly and tastes exactly like the best rhubarb pie you’ve ever had!


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We Love You, Pie Iron Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

Everyone knows the quickest way to a person’s heart is through a pudgie pie.  Quicker yet might just be a heart-shaped pudgie pie. Since we have yet to find a heart-shaped pie iron (hint-hint Rome Industries), we attempted the next-best thing.  While it was a labor of love to create, the Pie Iron Pineapple Upside-Down Cake we devised is pretty golden.

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We’ve been experimenting with cake batter lately, and it turns out that it works great in a pie iron.  If you don’t want to make an entire cake mix (can’t imagine why) you can just divide it by the number of eggs called for and divide the rest of the ingredients accordingly.  We found a pineapple cake mix calling for 3 eggs, so we just made 1/3 of it by adding 1 egg and 1/3 of the oil and water called for.  1/3 box of cake mix is the perfect amount for 2 pudgie cakes.

At first, we didn’t succeed.  The first 2 attempts at this pudgie tasted great, but our pineapple mysteriously disappeared from the outside both times.  First we tried filling the pie iron with batter and laying the pineapple and cherry on top, and then we tried putting the pineapple and cherry on the bottom and covering it with batter.  Each time the pineapple moved into the middle.

So, we tried, tried again. While it is a bit arduous, the key is to cook the batter in the iron for a few minutes to firm it up and then add the pineapple and cherry on top.  Oh, the things we’ll do for the love of pudgies.

Pie Iron Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

  • 1/3 box pineapple cake mix
  • 1 egg
  • 1/3 scant cup water
  • 5 T vegetable oil
  • 1 ring canned pineapple, heart shape optional
  • 1 maraschino cherry
  • high heat cooking spray

Directions:

Liberally spray pie iron pans with cooking spray.  Mix cake batter according to box directions. Fill one side of pie iron to the brim with cake batter.  Carefully close and place over heat source keeping iron extremely level.  Don’t be alarmed if a little oozing occurs.  After about 3 minutes, open iron and top batter with pineapple slice and cherry.  Close and continue cooking, about 5 minutes total on each side or until cake is golden brown.  Use a knife to gently release any stuck edges.  Let cool and share with the one you love!

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Thanks a Latke! FREE SHIPPING

We at Pudgie Revolution love the multitude of holiday traditions celebrated this time of year.  Every delicious dish is an invitation to devise a pudgie permutation.  In appreciation of Hanukkah, we’ve conjured up this delicious recipe for potato latke pudgie pies and are offering FREE SHIPPING on orders placed through our website from now until 12/14. L’chaim!IMG_4835Thanks a Latke! Pudgie Pie

2 large russet potatoes

1 small yellow onion

1 egg

3 TB breadcrumbs

1 tsp baking powder

salt and pepper

Peel and shred potatoes and onion.  Wrap in a towel and squeeze out as much moisture as you can.  Beat egg well and mix with breadcrumbs, baking powder, salt and pepper.  Add potato and onion mixture to egg mixture and stir to combine.

Spray inside of pie iron generously with high heat cooking spray.  Pre-heat iron over the fire for five minutes.  Remove hot iron from fire, spray again, and fill with potato mixture.  Cook over a medium hot flame until golden brown and crisp, about 3-4 minutes per side.

Serve with homemade applesauce and crockpot brisket.

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What’s Your “Pudgie Pie-losophy?”

A classic camping food is getting a makeover!  Three Wisconsin natives have teamed up to write a cookbook devoted to pudgie pies.  What’s a pudgie pie? It’s a grilled sandwich toasted in a pie iron over a fire. Known to some as mountain pies, tonka toasters, campfire pies or something entirely different, they are delicious no matter what you call them. According to authors Jared Pierce, Carrie Simon, and Liv Svanoe, pudgie pies are where it’s at when it comes to campfire cooking.

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“We live by our Pudgie Pie-losophy,” says Simon, “which is that anything you can think of eating will taste better in the form of a pudgie pie.” These longtime friends co-authored “Pudgie Revolution!  Pie Iron Cookin’ for Food Lovin’ Campers.”  Their cookbook puts a gourmet spin on this camping staple, raising the bar on conventional camp food. Pudgie Revolution! is filled with unique pudgie pie recipes that will inspire campers to bring their camp cookery to the next level. You don’t even have to be a camper to get in on the action—pudgie pies can be cooked in a backyard fire pit, on a grill, or even in a panini press.

Photographs of each recipe provide simple visual instructions that make following them easy as pie.  The recipes employ an array of crust materials including bread, pastry dough, hash browns, tortillas and batter. The filling combinations are just as diverse: try salami, mascarpone and figs or peanut butter and pickles. Light-hearted recipe titles like Yolkey Dokey, Pudge-Yam-a Party, and Revenge of the Curds add a fun factor to some seriously delicious sandwich pies.

“We wanted to elevate the pudgie pie beyond the white-bread-and-pie-filling variety we grew up with,” says Svanoe.  “While our recipes incorporate unconventional camping foods, they are all easily made in the outdoors.”  Each recipe includes a difficulty rating, and there are many useful tips throughout the book.  There is even a guide for creating a pudgie pie dessert box, which includes everything needed to satisfy any sweet tooth.  Don’t go camping without it!

You can get a copy of Pudgie Revolution! here  and you’ll also find links to the team’s Pudgie University video series here.  There you can learn how to make recipes from the cookbook, get cooking tips, and even hear a few puns.  “We just really love pudgie pies,” says Pierce, “and we want you to love them too!”